Delivered Duty Unpaid DDU Incoterms®  2000 is a transaction in international trade where the seller is responsible for safe delivery of goods, paying all transportation expenses but not the duty

 IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC)has issued the latest revision of International Commercial Terms,Incoterms® 2010 effective 1 January 2011

The Incoterms® rules are an internationally recognized standard and are used worldwide in international and domestic contracts for the sale of goods. First published in 1936, Incoterms® rules provide internationally accepted definitions and rules of interpretation for most common commercial terms.

It is worth noting  that all contracts made under INCOTERMS® 2000 remain valid even after 2011.Although using Incoterms® 2010 is recommended after 2011, parties to a contract for the sale of goods can agree to choose any version of the Incoterms rules after 2011. It is important however to clearly specify the chosen version INCOTERMS® 2010, INCOTERMS® 2000 or any earlier version.

The Incoterms® rules are an internationally recognized standard and are used worldwide in international and domestic contracts for the sale of goods. First published in 1936, Incoterms® rules provide internationally accepted definitions and rules of interpretation for most common commercial terms.

They help traders avoid costly misunderstandings by clarifying the tasks, costs and risks involved in the delivery of goods from sellers to buyers. Incoterms® rules are recognized by UNCITRAL as the global standard for the interpretation of the most common terms in foreign trade.


Delivered Duty Unpaid DDU Incoterms®  2000 is a transaction in international trade where the seller is responsible for safe delivery of goods, paying all transportation expenses but not the duty

Delivered Duty Unpaid DDU Incoterms®  2000 is a transaction in international trade where the seller is responsible for making a safe delivery of goods to a named destination, paying all transportation expenses but not the duty. The seller bears the risks and costs associated with supplying the good to the delivery location, where the buyer becomes responsible for paying the duty and other customers clearing expenses.

Delivered Duty Unpaid DDU from Incoterms®  2000, the authoritative text for determining how costs and risks are allocated to the parties. These terms are regularly incorporated into sales contracts worldwide and have become part of the daily language of trade.

Incoterms®  2000 came into effect on 1 January 2000.

DDU

Delivered Duty Unpaid
(... named place of destination)
Incoterms®  2000

Group D Arrival

Delivered duty unpaid DDU means that the seller delivers the goods to the buyer, not cleared for import, and not unloaded from any arriving means of transport at the named place of destination. The seller has to bear the costs and risks involved in bringing the goods thereto, other than, where applicable', any "duty" (which term includes the responsibility for and the risks of the carrying out of customs formalities, and the payment of formalities, customs duties, taxes and other charges) for import in the country of destination. Such "duty" has to be borne by the buyer as well as any costs and risks caused by his failure to clear the goods for import in time.

However, if the parties wish the seller to carry out customs formalities and bear the costs and risks resulting therefrom as well as some of the costs payable upon import of the goods, this should be made clear by adding explicit wording to this effect in the contract of sale.

This term may be used irrespective of the mode of transport but when delivery is to take place in the port of destination on board the vessel or on the quay (wharf), the DES or DEQ terms should be used.

 

Click below for the new and revised D Terms Incoterms® 2010 effective 1 January 2011

DAT Delivered At Terminal

DAP Delivered At Place

DDP Delivered Duty Paid

This Rule should be read in the context of the full official text of the rules which can be obtained from the ICC BusinessBookstore.

Click here for a list of all the 11 Incoterms 2000 Rules

Click here for a list of all the 13 Incoterms® 2010 Rules

Click here for the Made Easy e-Guide to Incoterms® 2010 Rules with its unique “Quick Reference Format”